One Habit You Must Develop To Leave Survival Mode

Releasing the trauma of grind and hustle

Maya Bechi, M.Ed

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Photo by alexey turenkov on Unsplash

Pursue creative endeavors.

Fully grown adults can take a gap year, play an instrument, sculpt, speak another language, compose music, vacation, create a recipe, write poetry, bird watch or take a pottery class. Living a lifetime of hustling is not a match for the human design. It is time for you to start a practice of creativity so that you can leave survival mode.

Unending grind and hustle is a state of poverty.

What is trauma?

It can be easy to diminish the value of words these days. We can become desensitized to the impact of a life experience on our outlook and decision making. Trauma is a word that falls into this category for me. I often think that a traumatic event is defined by loss of life, or extreme injury to the body, but that is a gross understatement. As a teacher of students who are exceptional learners, I am approaching a decade of working with trauma informed practices for the classroom. What I have learned, over time, is that I also need to understand what causes trauma for others. Since trauma is a response, it is important to learn to recognize the variety of distressing events that can illicit it. You have to look beyond the typical definitions as we encounter shifts in lifestyles and paradigms.

Photo by Andrik Langfield on Unsplash

Grind and Hustle

When I lived near a college town, I acquired a large collection of friends who were in the U.S. on F-1 Visas. Interestingly enough, the best kind of fun as a U.S. citizen in undergrad is not going to be with F-1 holders. They typically have an intangible timeclock counting down their university journey. They arrive to uni with the knowledge that their next 4–8 years will end in one of 4 ways: going back home to their country, getting a company to sponsor them, getting married, or winning the citizenship lottery. Needless to say, my friends were on their grind! There was something different about being around that kind of energy. I understood hard work and commitment from my grandfather, my aunts and older…

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Maya Bechi, M.Ed

Perfectly imperfect. A myriad of musings, research and writings. Educator, Indie Publisher, Supportive Human. Look me up. www.robsonandpuritan.com